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will gradually shrink as the population ages and the labor force contracts. they say japan will retain fourth place in terms of overall power, trailing only the u.s., china and india. the council experts say asian countries such as india and indonesia are likely to boost their military power. but they warn of an arms race in asia. if the u.s. scales back its military commitment in the region. they say some tionmay begin developing nuclear weapons. new car sales are fueling china's economy. sales grew 8.2% in november from the same time last year. officials say nearly 1.8 million units were sold last month. japanese firms lost out after chinese consumers boytted their vehicles over a territorial dispute. they saw a slight improvement last month. total new car sales this china were sluggish in september as japanese cars fell out of favorite. sales have been growing for two straight months since october. >>> the leaders of iraq say they are ready to make their coury a mayor player in the global oil market. they will double and quadruple oil output. businesses from arrange the world are eyeing wi
theaters reaching extraordinarily diverse audiences. from here to japan, his acclaimed sisters, maximoto premiered in 2005. in the last couple years he worked with camposanto on a fist of roses on male violence and an orchestral composition. many of his plays are collected in month more cherry blossoms published by washington press. among his awards are the civil liberties public education fund and lila wallace reader's digest award. phillip is also a respected independent film maker whose film recently premiered at sundance, but we're here to talk about his upcoming production, after the war. a jazz-infused drama set in post-war san francisco japan town in 1948 which chronicles the return of japanese americans into the internment -- from the internment camp. sharing this evening is chloe veltman. chloe was born in london and received a master's degree with distinction in conjunction with harvard university and the moscow art theater school. she has worked as a staff reporter for the daily telegraph and is a freelance writer, her articles appearing on both sides of the atlantic. she is t
people telling stories about san francisco's japan town, i began to come across this whole theme of during the internment camps japanese americans were interned. in this vacuum in japan town, there was the fillmore district with african americans and a variety of other people and they moved into the community. and then japanese americans get out of camp and they come back to their neighborhood that has been populated and made into a different life and different world and what happens when those two communities overlap and intersect? whose place is it, whose home is it? who is an american? how do we sort of coexist in this post war period where the people from that community are by and large marginalized, yet you have this whole kind of other thing happening where it's -- the war has been won, this is like new things, television is happening, advertising, this whole advertising thing is happening. so you have these marginalized peoples and what happens, is it possible to develop a kind of at that moment a cross-cultural community? is it possible to have kind of a multi cultural co
at this is basically something that you can ride along and freeload and let america and canada and japan handled? >> steve, your question -- >> i'm and freeload, by the way. >> that by the way is how the chinese would describe any relationship between japan and america. the interesting aspect of all these conflicts is that as india and china and india and china have a proximate geographically, but we've never been neighbors. >> right. >> in order to be neighbors you either have to love each other or hate each other. we have done neither. in fact, in 1962 during the first strategic conflict, between these two, you have to understand, it's hard to understand why we are not neighbors. [inaudible] in terms of inaccessible. but the positions, the lines, the strategies, the lines, what would they resonate to? the positions that are taken by postcolonial nations is that we will not be bound by decisions made by colonial powers. one, or in china's case, that we had to abandon our national positions. and now that we are strong, we need to resurrect them. right or wrong is not, that is very little to do w
strug off the coast of japan. a tsunami warning has been issued. i know it was felt very strongly there, alex. what can you tell us? >> well, atika, you mentioned some of the details. we were sitting in the office here in our bureau in tokyo, up on the ninth floor of this building. it's hard to describe, you can't really describe the feeling until you're into it. the one thing that grips me, i'm relatively new to living here in japan is the noise more than everything. everything basically shaking violently, our filing cabinets shaking. here's what i can tell you. you mentioned the 7.3 earthquake. a few other details just coming in. there are advisories -- pardon me, i'm looking off my notes. there are advisories for japan, but the pacific tsunami warning center has not issued a further alert beyond that. right now they're keeping it just to japan. we are hearing reports of possibly as much as a two-meter high tsunami warning in miagi prefecture. this is along the same fault lines, right where this happened in march of last year, the march 11th earthquake and tsunami that we all know ver
japan in the east china sea, cybersecurity and international diplomacy. this is an hour, ten minutes. >> welcome back, everybody. this session for miscalculation, china and the rise of confusion or confucianism. i'd like to hand over to steve clemens who's moderating this session. .. >> thank you all for joining us. when i was thinking about the title today and thinking about our panel, it occurred to me, and i went online to find a chinese event that is being held right now looking at u.s. grand strategy, canada, japan and india. there are no canadian, japanese americans or canadians on china's panel. don't have any chinese with us today but we should have a lot of fun discussing that our national strategies but involving in the asian pacific region and with china but i want to acknowledge that that voice wasn't with us today. that might give us more room to run. because we don't have a chinese voice on face, some years ago going to china and than the equivalent of the policy planning director and i said finally i can ask china but its grand strategy is. this is about 2004. and i sa
. he was laying there in japan. i said you're going to see my show tomorrow and he said, no i'm going home. so it makes you feel really big. >> are we ready? >> ♪ i wish that i could kiss each and every one of you ♪ >> you want to get a sample of that? >> reporter: during world war ii he brought his act to troops in the south pacific and entertained 15,000 marines on the island of pavu as they got ready for a big invasion. >> out of the kids 40% never got home. some months later i was going to a hospital, oakland california during my regular comedy routine and a patient covered with bandages took his hand out and said pavuvu. i greeted him and found out that the whole room was filled with guys from pavuvu. he opened his eyes and said bob hope when did you get here. i couldn't handle that i had to walk away. that was one of the touchest moments in -- toughest moments in my life. >> reporter: bob hope hoped to be a part of the troops at one moment, and the white house in the next. he entertained many presidents. >> it is my honor to give this to you. >> i like to tell jokes about a
were involved in relief operations in areas around the plant. japan piece in the government says it whalers are heading out to the sea but only carrying out research. the main group departed on the annual hunt in the southern ocean surrounding antarctica. japan introduced scientific whaling to avoid a commercial willing than under a 1986 moratorium. a man and australia survived being mauled by a shark. he was serving in new south wales. he lost a finger and chunk of his five. putting on a brave face for the cameras but shark attacks are unusual this time of year. >> the dolphins swimming all around him and all of the sudden the sharp just comes up and took for the chunks out of him and then he'd actually put the nose of the board into the bull shark's head. >> did a marvelous job. >> the chinese government has approved a law forcing internet users to use their real names. china says the new rules will help prevent rumors from spreading and clamp down on corruption. but on-line freedom advocates say the policy is intended to stifle dissent. robert bride is in hong kong and send th
-month high on the notion that the urbanization plan will gain spurs in the housing stocks there. japan, abe confirmed as prime minister there. the seventh prime minister in the past six years. we did see the yen hit a 20-month low against the u.s. dollar. notable lows against the euro as well. the topics in the nikkai the lowest in nine months. >> going back to his old job, that he had back in 2007. strange in and of itself. i wonder how long it will take for people to start talking about netflix after the outage going into christmas eve on social media. they were calling it no flix. and to blame amazon web services, which is one of their huge growth engines. a unit of the company they say is probably a tenth of its eventual size. >> one of the highest growth parts of amazon right now, the web services portion. their amazon is down 1.25%. i don't know if that's the reason. but it was the streaming center in northern virginia that was the source of the netflix outage. it's resolved, though, as far as we know. we don't know what sort of impacting -- >> i waste a vin't a victim, bu sure a lot
to that anxiety is that all? >> is the most problematic relationship now in japan and this is not good. i have to say i think japan probably hasn't played this as well as it might have, but i think on the other hand it would be fair to say also that it serves china's purposes to have something happening outside his orders which can rally people at home. there's a lot of complex things going on in each of these reactions to foreign movements outside. >> which makes your job complicated. i wonder if you go back to the news last week with the north koreans surprisingly, given reports of their technical difficulties but the long-range missile tests seem to fully back or not. >> we have been communicating with the chinese about the need to dissuade north korea from launching a missile. although they say for satellite into outer space it's using the same technology that's important, that would be used to launch a nuclear warhead. this type of missile technology is expressly covered under u.n. security council resolutions, prohibiting such testing of missiles and the type of technology, supported by
's bring in the director of japan studies at the american enterprise institute. thank you for joining us and i thank you for having me. hello, heather. heather: you have this article that you wrote for the national review online. the very first line of your article says this. save yourself a few precious minutes and ignoring everything that the u.s. government says about north korea. so what is going on? >> welcome the truth is we don't know what is going on. we are pretty clueless about north korea. all we know is that when it's time fore holidays and for us to relax, north korea will do something crazy like launching rockets on july 4 or maybe setting up another nuclear test around new year's. you know, we go through these cycles. we assume that one day we are going to get them back to the negotiating table, we try to do that, and then they turn around and they break their promise. we are right back where we started from. my point is that i think we should really stop thinking about what we can do to handle this situation. rather, we should accept that the north koreans control the tab
. over the past year, we reached a major agreements with japan to realign our forces and to really develop guam as a strategic kabul. -- hub. we have worked to strengthen cooperation with the republic of korea and we began a new marine rotational deployment to australia as well as increased air force cooperation. likewise we are deepening our engagement and developing rotational deployment with allies and partners such as singapore and the philippines and expanding our dialogue in exchanges with china. we are also an handed our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes -- expanding our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes allocating our naval fleet to have a 60/40 split between the pacific and atlantic oceans, increasing army and marine presence in the region. locating our most advanced aircraft in the pacific, including new deployments of f- 22's and the mv22's to japan. and lay the groundwork for the first overseas deployment of the f-35 joint strike fighter. the third element of our strategy is that as we do force projection in the asia-pacific and
in working with china as china came out of the cultural revolution. we have worked, basically from japan to australia, in deepening relationships for decades. i think the case has been that over the course of the last decade or so we have been very engaged in critical endeavors in the middle east and south asia. and i think there is a recognition now that as we responsibly wind down some of those commitments, that in many respects the lion's share of the history of the 21st century is going to be written in asia across the board -- strategically, politically, militarily. and the united states wants to be part of that. we are going to be part of that drama that plays out. now, we have stated very clearly that a critical component of that is a close working relationship with china. so when we engage, for instance, burma, we have our own history, our own motivations that are unrelated to other countries. so what we are seeking in our engagement is to underscore the positive-sum realities of what we want to accomplish working together. at every meeting we have with china's interlocutors, we
of all that, true. >> not such a crummy year for japan. japanese stocks rallying you can the yen continuing its slide against the dollar in all the major currencies, in fact. asian markets mixed overnight trading. the nikkei climbing to a closing level not seen since just before the march 2011 earthquake, marking a third day of gains, mostly drive bine hopes for a new stimulus policy. the yen is sitting closes to the lowest level since september 2010 against the dollar. interesting here because now a lot of people are saying the best or the hottest trade in 2013 will, in fact, be long japanese stocks and short the yen because what's different this time around, now there is an actual target, 90 is the target. we know where it is going to go. if they are able to weaken the yen to that point, it is a core roll lary stocks will go higher, exactly what happened with the united states, ben bernanke ease he can the monetary policy and the 14% gain in the stock market this year. >> seen the yen basically strangling japanese exports for so long. >> exactly. >> so you know, obviously i the
beyond to east of taiwan and japan and so on, first island chain they call it and they are developing specific capabilities to do that, highly accurate cruise and ballistic missiles that could potentially put our aircraft carriers at risk and building a lot of diesel and nuclear submarines, they have clearly been working on cyber and they have clearly been working on anti-satellite capabilities so those are some of the focused areas in which they are trying to be able to make, take advantage of our vulnerabilities. i worry that if their economy -- well, let me say, i think the only source of legitimacy for that regime is a steadily improving standard of living. if their economy begins to slow down and they can't do that, there is a lot of unrest in china today. i mean just to take one example, in social media, you know, there are thousands and thousands of demonstrations and riots in china every year, many of them in rural areas, well to paraphrase the old ad, it used to be that what happened this the village stayed in the village. >> rose: nobody knew? >> nobody knew, but now, it is
of the global economy at that time when the eurozone is still in recession in japan has also slid into recession. the risk is that this negotiation process could be protracted. i think president obama is proposing the concept of a fallback option, which would at least deliver some of the extension of the tax cuts and also unemployment benefits, which is very important. if the unemployment benefits cease after the first of january, that has an immediate impact on expenditure in the u.s. on about 2 million unemployed people. i think he is going to try to put together a skeleton deal to at least bridge the gap while negotiations continue. u.s. secretary of state -- >> u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton has been taken to hospital. she suffered a concussion earlier this month. she is being treated with blood thinning medication and she will be monitored for the next 48 hours. venezuela's ailing president has had a new health setback, suffering complications after surgery. vice president nicolas maduro made an unexpected trip to the capital of cuba, where president chavez is receiving cancer trea
video tutorial to help you solve some common problems. this one we think is coming to us from japan. what problem do we need to solve? [ baby crying ] >> the crying baby. >> they need to put this on a plane. >> this is like the crying baby tutorial kind of infomercial, but they're not really selling you anything, they're teaching you how to make your baby stop crying in three seconds. first, you drink a glass of water. you slurp it. two steps, drink water, slurp it. yeah, that's it. blow some of it out of your mouth. >> we're in -- i don't think you can blow it out. >> let me try this. >> blow it out? what are you doing, a spit take in the baby's face? >> yeah, you can't. doesn't work. >> i am highly impressed right now. i want to see it work. >> does that mimic the sounds inside the womb? >> possibly. >> is that what's happening here? it sounds like home? >> that's what i'm guessing. >> that baby looked really a peace afterwards there. it really looked calm. >> we want to know if this works for you. try this out, video it and upload those videos. >>> it's the end of a great year in
and nuclear weapons. it will result in weapons ownership. look at europe. look at japan. look at the rest of the world. we are way, way out there. we have the highest murder rate in the world. it hasn't protected us. it has resulted in arguments that should have a consequence of maybe a slap in the face, resulting in a bullet through the heart. it results in a double-murder in this case, a murder/suicide. guns don't protect. they cause suicide. >> let me bring in -- >> they cause suicide? >> i can promise, i'll get back to you, carol. here is what they say to me. i've had it all. but trying to get a debate going. i've been on two years on cnn. in that time, there's been a series of gun rages. each time it is the same debate and nothing gets done about it. 300 million guns and you have between 11,000 and 12,000 guns and murders a year. by comparison, britain has 35 as does germany and australia. japan has one or two. to countries that have strict gun control have very little gun murder. what do you say to americans who say it makes me feel safe? >> i think carole had it right. she said it
of china, japan, south korea, so what is your feeling, what is meant to have been. did you ask the u.s.. the ec, the south china, the sea of japan is in the 50's, 60's and 70's, all of these countries were internally focused. they were developing their own economies, their own national capacities, you know, their own military is. they're coming on line as a significant power in the 1970's, and it was under him that developed into a significant power. what's happened now is all these countries have developed. and because they have developed, they now have the ability to project power around words into the blue territorial soil that they claim. they didn't have this capacity before. so now we are seeing conflicts about islands in the geographical features that are below water and high tide that we never saw before. people say has everyone gone crazy in east asia? no, every once developed, and now they have military's command there's a conflict in -- and they've developed the navy and air force and there is this conflict and -- there's a conflict of for the geographical space. it's a ba
for swords in japan, and those swords would be sold back in england and the whole thing would start again. so the ex-peasant who is now running the show on a small plot of land handed over to him by the landlord would be an entrepreneur. effectively, he borrowed money from the landlord in order to pay for things, and pitiful wages in the form of corn, to the ex-peasants who are now wandering in the countryside knocking on doors because they don't have direct access to land. and some machinery -- shears for clipping wool. so land, labor, and capital, could be purchased in advance of production, on the basis that the entrepreneur, ex-peasant has to the landlord. so debt comes first, then comes distribution of income in the form of a labor contract. it will work for so many hours and i will give you so much corn. it was a combination of this reversal of the order from having production followed by a distribution, followed by debt, to having debt first, then distribution, then production. in conjunction with the great improvements in technology that unleashed the powers of capitalism, and capital
into orbit. leaders in wash washing, japan and south korea are calling for immediate consequences. even china is criticizing north korea's move. the three-stage ballistic missile was carrying a satellite which u.s. officials say is now tumbling out of control as it orbits around the earth. its purpose remains unclear. but officials say the rocket is similar in design to one that could potentially reach the united states, richard. >> forget about the satellite. this is essentially a long-range missile test. it's a question of when and not if north korea gets the capacity, among other things, to target the west coast of the united states. now, they still haven't figured out how to miniaturize their nuclear weapons and put them on top of that missile, but that day will come. so one thing we have is north korea continuing to be a bowl in a china shop. and all this talk of sanctions and consequences are just that. it's so much talk. china is either unable or unwilling to rein them in. meantime, you have china flying aircraft over disputed islands of japan. japan in response scrambling fighter jets
to christian democratic party in europe to resist communism appeals or in japan or much later on in the 1980s, the efforts made by the u.s. government to fund and support solidarity to undermind the communism regime in poland or when you think of the role playeded by the u.s. government to help smuggle out, and received a wide audience, and thinking of that, i think there are echoes here and lessons to learn for the present day of the ideological struggle we face today, and it's not a struggle against china, although they could be the greatest adversary in the long run, they do not have a transended ideology at the moment, but when you think about ideological struggle today, the obvious is against the forces of jihaddism extremism, and there is are lessons from "witness" on how to wage the day, and what should be known again as political warfare, and since he was invoked by the greatest explainer and student, i wanted to invox cannon from a 1948 memo he wrote on the organization of political warfare to define what i talk about when i say "political warfare." cannon said it's the employment of
to shoot it down. they wanted to fool japan. they succeeded. >> and it certainly does strengthen the new young leader kim jong-un domestically. >> absolutely. they have been trying since 1998 to launch a long-range missile and they failed in the previous four attempts. they succeeded in this. it's not a rocket that can deliver a major warhead. there are marriajor hurdles to >> they have done in north korea where a lot of people are starving what south korea has been unable to do. >> by choice, actually. >> they haven't launched a satellite into orbit. >> south korea has not. this will undoubtedly spur competition with south korea. you'll see that. you'll probably see south korea respond with more batteries and japan will probably already do that. you have heard that we need to spend more. we spend $10 million a year already on a missile system. it has international ramifications that are going to destabilize. this is why the security council is condemning the move. >> so how much of a real threat to the united states, whether hawaii or the west coast, is this? >> we are not threatened an
it is in their interests. if north korea's nuclear weapons program goes on other countries in the region, japan, south korea, taiwan and others are themselves going to look whether they want nuclear weapons which would obviously make the entire region much more unstable. jon: and for those who wondered whether kim jong-un had staying power as leader of north korea, he just bought himself a whole lot of time in that job, didn't he? >> well i think he showed that the capability of the north koreans has been underestimated and i think you're right. this will be a political boost for him but let's be clear. this rocket-testing program and the work with iran have been going on for decades and they have had some notable failures but each failure tells them something and each success tells them something. if they can put a payload into orbit which we concede they have apparently done, in effect they're well on the way to putting a nuclear payload anywhere on the planet. jon: two members of the original axis of evil still working together. ambassador john bolton, thank you. >> thank you. jenna: we're going to
and japan were rubble so we thought that was the natural order of things. it wasn't. and when the other industrial countries recovered we got world competition as we have. we ran into bankruptcies. chrysler now twice. we see that in the southern states where the transplants are without the unions. they weren't the ones who went bankrupt last -- in 2008 and 2009. so it really is a choice. it's a tough choice. and i sympathize with the unions but the fact is that in the global economy where you have to compete on wages and other elements, of the units of production, can you either have, you know, high wages with low employment or you can, as obama would say, spread around the wealth. the fact is that in the right-to-work states, unemployment is 6.9%. >> we have a graphic that shows right-to-work vs. non-right to work statements on employment, go ahead. >> and in the other stays the non-right-to-work it's 8.7. so you can choose to have fewer workers who enjoy higher inflated unnatural, if you like, wangs on uncompetitive wages. or competitive wages and more people employed. more people wit
of the war against japan at the marshall islands. the current uss enterprise was also on the way home on 11th september, 2001. just over three weeks later, she would launch the first strikes against al qaeda and the taliban in afghanistan. now imagine yourself aboard uss enterprise on the night of those first strikes. here's part of what her captain told the crew. aboard imper enterprise. good evening. the last time america actually went to war to defend against an attack on the homeland was almost exactly sixty years ago. when treacherous enemy conducted a surprise attack on pearl harbor. during that attack, a different enterprise was at sea on the way home and was ultimately in a response to that difficult and bloody task of soundly defeating an enemy. and ever since then when america has gone war it's been to protect freedom, and our vital interest in those of our allies. we are have not had to defend our homelands since december 7, 18941. however on september 11 the our enterprise was at sea on the way home during a treacherous new attack on our country. and tonight the ship named enterpr
the other day. japan just had another tsunami. the disaster of sewage and leaks. the climate apex for a meeting was just a in dubai. they came to the conclusion that climate change is over use of fossil fuels and natural gas and oil. the amount of fossil fuels utilize by countries with huge populations such as india and china. we need energy, but we need to move onto clean energy. that is one of the president's priorities. he can create a whole new infrastructure that replaces the military industrial that eisenhower warned us about. host: thank you for the call. speaking along the lines of the environment and the epa. there is this -- from "to the boston globe" -- this from "the l.a. times" -- from "the gazette" in colorado -- our question for you is, what the think the president's no. 1 priority should be? just is joining us on the democrat line. caller: good morning. it was a little bit of serendipity that you read the editorial from "the new york times." i believe the first priority, our entire government should be repairing the infrastructure of the country. we have some infra
the committee in the house -- in house resolution 121. it was a resolution calling upon japan to apologize during the imperial army during world war ii, women forced into sexual slavery. he achieved justice for those who suffered atrocities in the past and his leadership will be missed. i also want to thank him for his leadership on the issue of pat tillman, soldier who was -- he lost his life in a firefight when in fact he was killed through -- and i want to appreciate that. lynn woolsey came to congress with a compelling story about how with the helping hand from her government she was able to raise three children by herself and have a successful career serving the people of marina and sonoma counties. she's been a tireless voice for family-friendly policies, for protecting the coastline of northern california and for bringing our troops home and ending the misguided wars in iraq and afghanistan. lynn was a leader of the congressional progressive caucus and i call her the mom of the caucus. and her passionate voice on progressive issues, she will be missed. her leadership will be missed
come in from japan. what has been the reaction to that rocket launch from the north koreans? >> the amazing thing here in south korea is that even with the rocket launch, folks here are working, they're building, they're thriving. they're focused. and they're building their economy. there's actually been relatively little conversation and don't seem all that worried. i think they believe the foreigners that are here are a lot more worried than they are. they're going about their business, and their business is building the country, building the economy. it's been very impressive to see what i've seen. >> governor, roland martin here. i'm curious. you're trying to bring business from south korea to your state. what kind of business, though? how are you pairing those two up in terms of what your state is good at? south korea might say, hey, it might be a good idea for us to go? >> when i was in the business world, i spent a lot of time visiting customers. now that i'm governor, i still spend time visiting customers. some of those customers are right in delaware, but some of th
is going on in north korea, south korea, and japan. what does that prove for the administration? guest: you can put north korea in the same category as japan and south korea. they have taken power and have produced leaders but are still checked by the open society and by the democratic political system. kim jong un is the son of kim jong il who died about a year ago. to say he is a hawk misses the point. he is a tyrant. he continues to sell arms to countries like iran and build their nuclear program. host: south korea and japan -- any specific challenges? guest: the main challenge for the korean peninsula is that at some point north korea is going to collapse. it is already a basket case country. will you have the kind of transition you had in germany? today germany is to lay prosperous country. will south korea consider the north koreans to be their cousins and brothers? there is a huge disparity at this point. you can see the physical difference because of the questions of nutrition and the way they are raised. is a total state based on fear. the challenge is to figure out how to absorb w
on the obligation and the expenditure of u.s. and government of japan funds to support the military buildup on guam. i believe that this bill sends a strong message that the united states remains committed to providing resources to refocus on the asia pacific region. and also, i'm also pleased that the conference report includes a requirement that flags the district of columbia and the u.s. territories be displayed at u.s. military installations around the world. and i ask my colleagues to support this conference report. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. the gentleman from massachusetts is recognized. mr. frank: mr. speaker, the request of the chairman of the full committee, i would now yield to him, i believe he intends to conduct a colloquy, two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. mckeon: i thank the gentleman for yielding. mr. speaker, i yield two minutes to the gentleman from kentucky for the purpose of a colloquy. >> thank you, chairman mckeon. i certainly want to thank you and mr. smith and your staffs for your hard work
japan attacked pearl harbor and america joined world war ii. >> the pivotal moment in american history remembered today with a moment of silence at pearl harbor in hawaii at 7:55 a.m. that's the exact time the bombs dropped, killing 2,390 service members and 49 civilians. amazing. >> that's it for us. thanks very much for watching. you can always follow what's going on here in the situation room on twitter. i'm @wolfblitzer. >> i'm yt kate bolduan. >>> "erin burnett outfront" starts right now. >> outfront next, john boehner says the sprt slow walking to the edge of the fiscal cliff. but the house speaker did give us one flash of hope if you listen to his words very carefully. the u.s. is updating its military plans against syria as new intelligence shows assad's regime is loading sarin gas into bombs. and president obama's pot problem. let's go "outfront." >>> i'm tom foreman in for erin burnett. outfront tonight, the magic number after a whole week of harsh words here in washington and threats to, did house speaker john boehner hint ever so slightly at a compromise today that
was the third state. off i wants to japan to recruit nissan. we had virtually no rot owe jobs in tennessee at the time. they took a look at the united states and a map of the united states at night shows that most of the people live in the east, a map with the lights on. most of the people live in the east and the center of the markets where you're going to be if you're making big, heavy thifntle the center oheavething. they looked aggressively at tennessee, kentucky, georgia. then they looked at something else. every state north of us did not have a right-to-work law. so niece saso nissan came to te. the united auto workers came to tennessee. they a different labor environment there. the workers at the saturn plan are members of the united autoworkers. but it is a right-to-work statement and over the last 30 years there are probably a dozen large assembly plants in the southeastern part of the united states sms there are about 1,000 suppliers in our state. what has been the effect of the arrival of the art owe industry in tennessee? it attracted, aamong other things, by our right-to-work
point of view was gorbachev also wanted to improve relations with china and japan. with 100 inf missiles directed at them how has he going to do that? it was not in their interests to have 100 missiles out of europe and it was really in their interests. we now have access and have for some years to records of politburo discussions and let me go back to a couple words about president reagan. before he first met gorbachev, he rode out on the yellow pad several pages without prompting from anybody what he wanted to achieve at geneva in his first meeting. mcfarland handed this to me as we regretting it off of the plane to go to geneva saying this is what the president had on his mind. if he is wrong we will straighten him out. it was a very perceptive paper and among other things he pointed out that the biggest problems, one of these was lack of trust. that he had to find a way to begin to create trust. we are not going to solve anything else. he also added, if i don't achieve anything else, i must convince gorbachev that we don't want an arms race. if he wants one he is going to lose it. an
. ♪ a powerful, fuel-efficient engine, but it's not from japan. it's a car like no other... from a place like no other. introducing the all-new 2013 chevrolet malibu, our greatest malibu ever. ♪ [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen to them. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] it doesn't. stop pretending. only flood insurance covers floods. ♪ visit floodsmart.gov/pretend to learn your risk. i just finished a bowl of your new light chicken pot pie soup and it's so rich and creamy... is it really 100 calories? let me put you on webcan... ...lean roasted chicken... and a creamy broth mmm i can still see you. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. >>> five, six shots and i heard him yell out i am the shooter. >> people were just jumping. babies were crying. it was unreal. >> he's sitting there pointing the gun at some people so we ran to the fitting rooms, grabbed the people, then ran out the back exit to get out of there. >> witnesses describing the chaos and absolute horror that took place in a crowde
have been very strong. china has been strong. mandy, you know, japan has been strong, and the banks have been strong. to me there's an underlying strength to the market when some of the bodyguards have been doing well so i think the market wants to do better. that having been said the fiscal cliff will turn out to be not a maxi deal but a mini deal and will clip the economy not by 1% but a 2% and a 60% chance something will get done but that's where we come out on it right now. a little bit harder hit to the economy. >> don't adjust your sets, everybody. this is what bob sounds like today. >> this is a different exchange here. >> not doing your imitation of david? >> what do you think that the seasonal factors are a major reason why the markets are holding up so well? if you look at the havens, gold, treasuries, for example, the dollar, there's no sign of panic in the haven. >> silver is down. you've seen a little bit of a lift in the vix, closer to 20. that's not bad, a normalization type of thing. treasuries have sold off a little bit. that means the patient is leaving the hospita
trials and hardships before finally going into the first squadron in japan. there he became an gauge to the girl he loved and was on top of the world. when extra troops failed to arrive in afghanistan that summer, the summer of 2009, matthew volunteered on the ground to help out. the absolutely found his niche with those marines. he took leave the first of july and secretly married theresa. july 10 was the last time i saw him. he arrived in afghanistan the end of july and wrote these final words in his journal on august 2. mom, dad, i can never repay you for all you have done for me. you made me into the man i am today. i hope that i have made you proud. that has always been my goal. i love you both so much. tell the girls i love them and couldn't be prouder older brother. i have always tried to be an honorable man and i truly believe in what we are doing here. i am doing this for my family so that they need not fear. my country so that can be a beacon of light for the entire world. the men around me because no one could ask for it better company than the u.s. armed forces and finall
. breaking news now from the asian markets. japan's nikkei rising to its highest level since march of 2011. 21-month high. hope for actions from the central bank there. year-end bonus for big labor. national labor relations board stripped more protection for workers that don't want their monday wrip spent on politics. you don't knowones are yielding huge power in another way as the clock is ticking on the threatened strike that could shut down every port from maine to the texas gulf coast. once again, unions versus capitalism. here now is vincent, director of labor policy. good to have you here, vincent. >> thanks important having me on. >> so -- do i understand this correctly? if you are in a state that doesn't have right-to-work laws, you join a company that has a union shop and you have to pay dues and join the union. the money you spend on politics, i don't have to pay for that. has that changed now? is that something the labor relations board has done. make it a lot tougher to say i don't want to pay that. >> it has. one more example of the national labor relation board putting union
. well, i'm asking you, are you a jap? i said my father was born in japan, my mother is japanese, i suppose that makes me one. >> we don't cut jap here. i was so tempted to strike him. but then i thought if i had done that, all the work that we had done would be for nil. so i just looked at him and i said i'm sorry you feel that way. and i walked out. >> he just walked out. sena the senator showed great courage on the battlefield and he showed great courage facing injustice at home. he rose above pettiness. that may be his true greatness and we shall all honor it. may he rest in peace. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >> battle lines. let's play "hardball." >> good evening, i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start with this. it's five days until christmas, 12 till new years and the battle lines are drawn. the trenches have been dug. the president has made his promise and intends to keep it. that promise is fairness. he cannot go along with any republican deal that protects the wealthy. he will risk the cliff to keep his promise. if it comes to
, housing market, china, japan. i would buy some things. >> guys, got to cut you off. larry, you'll get more time next time, promise. see you later, jim. >>> we're all over the fiscal fiasco. tune in to cnbc this sunday night. yep, we're working the weekend at cnbc, 8:00 p.m. eastern time for a cnbc special report "america's economy held hostage" because remember house of represent representatives called back into session sunday night. don't be too depressed. we did get good news today and it was important. a major strike that could have crippled the economy was at least delayed. we'll have those details coming up. she knows you like no one else. and you wouldn't have it any other way. but your erectile dysfunction - you know, that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medication
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, but it's not from germany. ♪ a powerful, fuel-efficient engine, but it's not from japan. it's a car like no other... from a place like nother. introducing the all-w 2013hevrolet malibu, our greatest malibu ever. ♪ >>> well, movie producers trying to get their film an oscar nod better kick their pr efforts into high gear. nomination ballot are tuchdu due january 3rd. grae drake is here to make some predictions and so everybody has been talking about "argo" but there could be some sort of surprises, come out of nowhere movies. what's going on? >> this is the time of year where hollywood is all abuzz, and you can sit in a restaurant and hear something whispering about the new movie that's going to get a nomination. i think first and foremost, most of these movies aren't out yet for people to see, but keep a close eye out. starting with "the impossible." this is a movie starring naomi watts and ewan mcgregor. a family, a true story. they went to thailand two days before the tsunami, and the movie is aptly titled because it's impossible not to lose your mind crying during it. the filmm
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